Oversleeping: How Much Sleep Is Too Much?

5 min read
5 min read

We all know how important sleep is to a healthy lifestyle. Too much sleep can have adverse effects on your well-being. Insufficient sleep can lead to health disorders, but on the other hand, oversleeping can also lead to some health risks. So, how much sleep is too much? Our detailed guide will help you understand everything related to oversleeping, its symptoms, causes, and much more.

What Is Oversleeping?

According to a study by  National Sleep Foundation, a healthy adult needs seven to nine hours of sound sleep for a healthy lifestyle. Oversleeping or hypersomnia refers to a state of sleeping in which a sleeper sleeps more than the recommended benchmark of seven to nine hours daily. 

Symptoms of Oversleeping

Frequent oversleeping impacts your health badly and leads to severe health symptoms; a few symptoms of too much sleep are listed below.

  • Low energy
  • Memory problems
  • Lapses in attention
  • Loss of appetite
  • Anxiety
  • Headaches
  • Obesity
  • Back pain
  • Depression
  • Unwanted accidents while using heavy machinery

Check out our article on hypersomnia and get insights about oversleeping through our detailed blog.

Causes of Oversleeping: Why Am I Sleeping So Much?

According to the American Sleep Association, about two percent of people face symptoms of hypersomnia or oversleeping. People get inadequate sleep during weekdays and try to compensate for the lost sleep on weekends by sleeping more than usual. Your daily habits play a significant role in becoming an oversleeper. 

Some health conditions make you sleep extra; a few of them are listed below:

  • Depression and Anxiety 

According to the National Institute of mental health, people with depression and anxiety are more likely to experience sleeping disorders such as sleep deprivation and oversleeping.

  • Thyroid issues

Thyroid imbalances lead to sleep problems. An overactive thyroid causes sleeping issues due to arousals from nervousness; it also leads to constant feelings of tiredness. An overactive thyroid leads to frequent night sweats and constant urges to urinate; these are enough to disrupt sleep leading to naps during the day and excessive sleeping at night.

  • Heart disorders

Heart disorders lead to excessive tiredness, reduction of breath, and a feeling of being simply worn out. This fatigue may lead to disruptions in sleep and may lead to oversleeping disorder.

  • Sleep apnea

Obstructive Sleep apnea impacts breathing during your sleep and may also stop breathing temporarily. Sleep apnea disrupts sleep during the night leading to a groggy feeling during the daytime. To compensate for the lost sleep, you may nap during the day and sleep longer at night, leading to excessive sleeping.

  • Narcolepsy

There are three stages of Narcolepsy, and all of them lead to over sleepiness. Primary Narcolepsy leads to excessive daytime sleepiness and constant urges to sleep called sleep attacks. Secondary Narcolepsy, caused by injury to the hypothalamus, may lead a person to sleep for more than 10 hours each night. 

Let us understand the side effects of oversleeping in the next section.

Negative Effects of Sleeping Too Much

By now, you might have understood oversleeping is an unhealthy practice. The side effects of sleeping too much are listed below.

Back Pain

Sleeping a lot in a particular ergonomic position or oversleeping on an old or unsupportive mattress may worsen back pain symptoms.

Headache

Headache from sleeping too much is a common phenomenon in oversleepers—oversleeping impacts the neurotransmitters in the brain, including serotonin that leads to headaches.

Heart Disease

According to a study, people having a bedtime of more than eight hours frequently were more likely to have angina chest pain and had 10% more chances to come across a heart disease.

Increased Weight Gain

According to a Canadian study conducted for six years, oversleepers gained a considerable weight (1.58kg) and experienced an increased weight gain than normal sleepers. 

How to Stop Oversleeping?

Oversleeping has adverse effects on your health, and you need to prevent oversleeping to have a healthy lifestyle. Listed below are a few tips that will help you stop sleeping too much.

  • Avoid sleeping too much on the holidays, especially on the weekends, as it impacts your circadian rhythm and leads to oversleeping on weekdays.
  • Exercise regularly
  • Prepare and follow a sleep schedule of seven to eight hours every night.
  • Try exposing yourself to natural light in the morning
  • Reduce the caffeine consumption at least six hours before bedtime
  • Avoid napping during late afternoons as it makes it hard to fall asleep during the night and leads to excessive sleeping. 
  • Avoid using digital devices before bedtime, as they emit blue light that disrupts your sleep and leads to oversleeping during weekends.

Check out our blog on sleep habits and good sleep hygiene to understand the importance of sleep habits in getting quality deep sleep.

How Many Hours of Sleep Do You Need?

The table below shows the nine different age groups and the recommended sleep time hours.

Age Group
Recommended Hours of Sleep
Newborn
0-3 months old
14- 17 hours
Infant
4-11 months old
12-15 hours
Toddler
1-2 years old
11-14 hours
Preschool
3-5 years old
10-13 hours
School-age
6-13 years old
9-11 hours
Teen
14-17 years old
8-10 hours
Young Adult
18-25 years old
7-9 hours
Adult
26-64 years old
7-9 hours
Older Adult
65 or more years old
7-8 hours

When to See a Doctor

Try to get your sleep back on track yourself by:

  • Waking up and sleeping at the same time every day
  • Embracing natural light when you wake up
  • Avoiding electronic devices close to bedtime

Even after changing your daily routine, if you find yourself sleeping excessively regularly. It is time to schedule a visit with your doctor.

The Final Word

Sleeping too little or too much invites a host of health disorders that impact your healthy lifestyle. It is essential to understand the best amount of sleep for your body and take the necessary steps if you are sleeping too much. Hopefully, our detailed guide might have helped you know how much sleep is too much for you.

Happy Sleeping!

According to researchers, there is a greater risk of obesity among people who sleep excessively.

It’s important to remember that oversleeping is a symptom of depression and that oversleeping doesn’t cause depression.

According to experts, a healthy adult should get around 7-9 hours of sleep daily; Sleeping more than 7-9 hours is considered oversleeping, leading to severe medical issues.



Yes, sleeping too much can increase your perception of fatigue, and you might find yourself dragging the next day if you sleep excessively.



Oversleeping can lead to severe medical issues such as diabetes, heart disease, and an increased risk of death.

You can take a short nap without oversleeping by planning your nap time in the early afternoon, avoiding distractions while napping, and consuming coffee before the nap.



According to experts, healthy adults need 7-9 hours of sleep every day.

Excessive sleepiness can lead to chronic diseases such as diabetes, heart disease, and an increased risk of death.

Too much sleep increases the chances of chronic diseases, such as heart failure, diabetes, depression, anxiety, and obesity in adults aged over 45.

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Meet Our Review Board

Each week our team researches, writes and collaborates with industry leaders to bring you simple easy-to-read sleep information.

David Bridge

Sleep Coach

Siddhesh Tiwatne

Sleep Coach

Authored by healh experts and journalists

Fact checked and science-backed

Medically reviewed by physicians

Meet Our Review Board

Each week our team researches, writes and collaborates with industry leaders to bring you simple easy-to-read sleep information.

David Bridge

Sleep Coach

Siddhesh Tiwatne

Sleep Coach

Authored by health experts and journalists

Fact checked and science-backed

Medically reviewed by physicians

Disclaimer

www.sleepauthority.com is brought to you by Resident. Our company sells Nectar, DreamCloud, Awara, Level Sleep, and Home Well Designed. While we intend for this site to be an educational and useful resource for consumers interested in sleep-related topics, we also promote our family of brands – brands that we believe in – on this website. Where we have commissioned independent research and/or articles to support our content, we will state as such in the sub-heading of the article. Where we compare our brands and products against others, we will provide the review criteria as well as state our basis for choosing the “best” or “top” product in a link accompanying the comparison. Our aim is to assist consumers in choosing the best solution for getting restful and comfortable sleep and it is our belief that there is a Resident product that meets any sleeper’s needs.

Meet Our Review Board

Each week our team researches, writes and collaborates with industry leaders to bring you simple easy-to-read sleep information.

David Bridge

Sleep Coach

Siddhesh Tiwatne

Sleep Coach

Authored by health experts and journalists

Fact checked and science-backed

Medically reviewed by physicians

Meet Our Review Board

Each week our team researches, writes and collaborates with industry leaders to bring you simple easy-to-read sleep information.

David Bridge

Sleep Coach

Siddhesh Tiwatne

Sleep Coach

Authored by health experts and journalists

Fact checked and science-backed

Medically reviewed by physicians