How to Dispose of a Mattress?

7 min read
7 min read

It’s exciting to buy a new mattress, but the challenge of disposing of an old mattress brings down the excitement. Did you know that The US dumps around 18.2 million mattresses every year, and more than 50,000 mattresses are tossed in a landfill? It’s terrible for our environment, and we can help cut down the figure by learning to dispose of a bed properly.

How to get rid of a mattress properly? To help reduce the numbers, we should use proper ways to dispose of the mattresses. Ideally, we should change our mattresses every ten years. It could be sooner or later based on the other factors. Are you confused about what to do with an old mattress?

With this post, we will help you figure out the best ways to dispose of a mattress. Continue reading to learn how to dispose of a mattress for free or with a minimal amount.

Recycle a Mattress

The most eco-friendly way to dispose of a mattress is to recycle them. Mattress Recycling Council says that 80% of mattresses can be broken down and recycled, so why not try it? How to recycle mattress? You can see if your mattress is recyclable by a quick Google search. Search for mattress recycling services in your area on the web, enter your ZIP Code for accurate results. 

For instance: mattress recycling services zip code 10006

These recycling centers will pick up your mattress from your doorstep for a nominal fee. If you live in Connecticut, California, or Rhode Islands, you can have a free pick or low fee facility. So, the cost differs from state to state. 

Where to recycle mattress? Here are some common recycling resources you can choose from.

City Resource: Get in touch with the city’s municipal offices that handle trash and recycling. You can get all the recycling-related information from them. 

Bye Bye Mattress: With their help, you can learn about recycling programs in EPR-enacted states. Visit their website for more information. 

Earth 911: With more than 1,00,000 listings, Earth 911 is the largest online database for recycling centers. Enter your zip code to get the accurate details. 

Donate a Mattress

Many people prefer to donate old or used mattress rather than throw them away. By donating your mattress, you can help people in need and create more space in your home.

Unfortunately, you cannot donate every mattress. If your mattress is not usable or has bedbugs, it cannot be donated. 

Due to the increase in high-quality mattresses, sanitization issues and affordability standards have increased. Donating a bad-quality mattress will not only be rude but also will be a waste of time. So, if your mattress is in a usable condition, you can consider donating it. 

Can You Donate Your Mattress?

You can donate your mattress to the following organizations. 

1. Bedbugs

If you have any kind of infestation in your mattress, avoid donating it. Infestations like bed bugs and mold can be harmful to sleepers. They can worsen your skin allergies and infections. 

2. Stains

Mattresses with significant as well as minor stains should not be donated. If the stains are not that prominent, you can use a handheld vacuum cleaner or a non-toxic enzyme cleaner to get rid of them.

3. Odors

If your mattress has a mild smell, you can try sprinkling baking soda on the top and let it sit for some hours. Afterward, vacuum off the baking soda and air it outside. 

Where to Donate a Mattress?

Organizations you can donate your mattress to include:

1. Salvation Army

If your mattress is good enough to donate, you can reach out to the Salvation Army. They provide free mattress pickup in many locations, and if not, you can drop off your mattress at the nearest Salvation Army center. 

2. Habitat for Humanity

Habitat for Humanity works worldwide to help people have affordable housing. It may offer mattress pickup. They own a chain of thrift stores called Restore. Contact your nearest Restore to learn more about mattress donation. 

3. Goodwill

Goodwill sells donated items in thrift stores. With the sales, they fund education and training programs to help people in need. Some locations do accept mattresses in good condition, and some don’t. Contact your nearby Goodwill store to learn more about the donation. 

4. Furniture Bank Association of America

The Furniture Bank Association of America provides furniture to poor people at no or low cost. There are more than 80 FBAAs in the USA, and these usually accept mattresses in good condition. If you live within 32 kgs of a furniture bank, they will collect your mattress. If not, you can drop off your mattress at their store. Contact them in advance to learn more about the procedure. 

5. Catholic Charities

Catholic churches have small charity organizations all over the USA to help children, refugees, homeless and disabled people. They run many housing programs and are often in need of beds. Check their website to learn if they are looking for mattresses. 

Give It Away or Resell

If you cannot find any good donation or recycling center, the next best option is to give it away to someone directly. 

Who takes used mattresses? Many people might be interested in taking an old mattress to save money. If your mattress is in good condition, you can resell it too. Contact your friends, coworkers, and family members. You can also put a post on social media to gather more interested people. Make sure you mention that it’s free or paid, and provide the images and dimensions to ease the process. You can also place flyers on familiar places like schools, colleges, office buildings, and more such sites. 

Repurpose or DIY Recycling

Many people love DIYs! If you are one of those creative and crafty people, you can easily repurpose your old mattress. If you are out of ideas, there are numerous ideas available online. 

Break down the mattress. Mattress and box springs have materials like steel, memory foam, latex foam, natural fibers, wooden parts, nails, screws, and more. You can use these materials for the following:

1. Break Down the Mattress And Recycle the Parts. 

If you have the needed tools and time, you can easily break the mattress and the box spring into recyclable parts. If the recycling centers are not accepting the whole mattress, they might take the parts. Contact your local recycling facilities to learn if they take the mattress parts. 

2. Garden

You can use the wooden parts of the mattress for gardening. Wood can work great as a lawn mulch or a composite bin. 

3. Decoration

You can melt the coils and spring of the mattress and use them as candle holders, ornaments, and more. 

4. Home Projects

You can use foam and cotton to make pet beds, pillows, carpet padding, fillers, and more.

Throw It Away

Your last option should be to throw away mattress. If you cannot recycle, repurpose, resell, or donate your mattress, you can only throw it away. Where to dispose of mattress?  Where to throw away a mattress? Throwing away is not as simple as it sounds. You cannot leave it in the trash. You might get a fine for it. Many cities have strict rules regarding throwing away a mattress. 

How to Throw Away a Mattress?

Waste Disposal Service

Several waste disposal services can help you get rid of the waste that can’t go in regular garbage. You can find these service providers easily with a quick google search. Search for waste disposal services (your ZIP code), and you may find the nearest disposal services. 

  • Load Up
  • 1-800-Got-Junk

Things to Consider Before Disposing of an Old or Used Mattress

  • Mattress Warranty

 The mattress company within a time frame will replace your mattress if it gets damaged. The time frame can be anything between 5 to 10 years. Check if your mattress covers removal and replacement. If it does not cover mattress removal, you’ll have to dispose of it yourself.

  • State Policies

Disposing of a mattress is complicated in some states. However, if you live in Connecticut, California, and Rhode Islands, the laws are simple, and it’s easy to dispose of a mattress in these states. Before disposing of a mattress, make sure you research correctly and learn about the rules and regulations. 

Signs You Need a New Mattress

How do I know if I need a new mattress? Usually, you should change a mattress every ten years. It can be slightly sooner or later, depending on your mattress condition.  Below are ten signs that show you need a new mattress.

  1. The mattress is sagging.
  2. It has worn edges.
  3. It has started to smell.
  4. You wake up with aches and pains.
  5. You wake up with skin problems.
  6. You have trouble falling asleep.
  7. It has broken coils.
  8. It squeaks and makes noise. 
  9. It has become dusty, and you have started sneezing and coughing more often. 
  10. You feel your sleep partner’s movement more than usual.

If you face any of the signs mentioned above, you should get rid of an old or used mattress and consider buying a new one. 

Conclusion

If you have decided to dispose of your mattress, make sure you do it properly. Check your warranty and research the related laws. 

No, in some states, you can even get a fine to dump mattress. Contact a nearby waste disposal service provider. They may provide a pickup service, and if not, you have to drop off your mattress in their nearest office. 

Waste management may take mattresses. Contact them to learn more about mattress disposal services. 

  • Remove the pillowcases.
  • Store the pillows in a garbage bag.
  • Contact an animal shelter if they are looking for pillows. You can also bring pillows to charity or thrift stores.
  • Reuse the pillows, if possible.
  • If you cannot reuse it, throw it in a dustbin. 

Disposing of a mattress with professional help may cost you around  $75 to $150. Dumping it will cost you about $15 to $50.

A mattress lasts for about ten years. However, this may vary depending on how you keep the mattress. 

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Meet Our Review Board

Each week our team researches, writes and collaborates with industry leaders to bring you simple easy-to-read sleep information.

David Bridge

Sleep Coach

Siddhesh Tiwatne

Sleep Coach

Authored by health experts and journalists

Fact checked and science-backed

Medically reviewed by physicians

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Meet Our Review Board

Each week our team researches, writes and collaborates with industry leaders to bring you simple easy-to-read sleep information.

David Bridge

Sleep Coach

Siddhesh Tiwatne

Sleep Coach

Authored by health experts and journalists

Fact checked and science-backed

Medically reviewed by physicians

Meet Our Review Board

Each week our team researches, writes and collaborates with industry leaders to bring you simple easy-to-read sleep information.

David Bridge

Sleep Coach

Siddhesh Tiwatne

Sleep Coach

Authored by health experts and journalists

Fact checked and science-backed

Medically reviewed by physicians