Quilt vs Comforter: Which Is The Best?

6 min read
6 min read

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Quilt vs Comforter: Which Is The Best?

Being cozy at night and having a peaceful sleep is all that one needs at the end of the day. However, our body structures are built differently. Therefore, we all have varied demands when choosing bedding styles in the home decor section. Should I go for a comforter or a quilt? This question pertains to our minds consistently.

To lessen the severity of this head-screeching task, we’ve listed below the comparisons between quilt vs comforter for winters and summers. In addition, we’ve Elaborated more on nuances like material, durability, and size for these bedding styles. 

What Is a Quilt?

Made of two or more layers of textile, a quilt is composed of three layers, including the middle filler material, which is often called batting.

The top layer in a quilt is woven cloth, followed by the middle filler, either wool/cotton/fiber depending on the individual’s need, and lastly, a woven back. A quilt is often passed down as family heirlooms or talismans.

What is a quilt used for?

Quilt is multi-purpose and can be used in versatile ways. It majorly is used to keep oneself warm during winters and provide a mushy sleep. In addition, however, due to Its intricate patterns, it serves as a decoration item.

Benefits of using a quilt

  1. Light-weighted quilts keep you cool during extremely hot weather.
  2. It is made with much breathable material like cotton or fiber, thereby not keeping the body hot.
  3. Due to its lightweight and foldable size, it’s easy to wash and store.
  4. Easy to transport and carry.
  5. Has a more bohemian or decorative appearance.

 

What Is a Comforter?

A comforter is a type of bedding made of usually three layers. Here is when the difference between a comforter vs quilt starts. This is made of two cloth pieces that are stitched or woven together. The middle filler material can be any insulative material ranging from feathers, silk, polyester, etc. 

What is a comforter used for?

The best comforters are made fluffy and thick to keep an individual warm during cold days. When one is in extreme temperatures or cold places, comforters provide a cozy sleep due to the weight of the filler material. Additional sheets or covers can also be used before wearing a comforter.

Advantages of using a comforter

  1. It is best for deep sleepers
  2. It provides warmth and peaceful sleep at night.
  3. It is quite affordable on the wallet.
  4. It is easy to wash and be taken care of 
  5. Comes in various block colors and palates.

What Is the Difference Between Quilts and Comforters?

Every individual has a different need in terms of bedding styles, sleeping patterns, payment capacity, or the purpose of the shopped item. Let’s delve into the difference between a quilt and a comforter.

  • Material

A comforter is made of lighter material or fabric, whereas a quilt is much heavier. A quilt has softer padding than a comforter in comparison. Quilts are made thinner and flatter than comforters. On the other hand, comforters are more fluffy. 

A quilt is made of heavy fabrics and a softer layer of cotton and down feathers for better breathability during sleep. A comforter is two sheets woven with polyfill in the middle that provides warmth but isn’t as heavy as quilts.

  • Warranty

Whenever a comforter is bought from a well-known brand, it always has a warranty attached to it. One must always check for terms and conditions lying at the back of purchasing and return policies of comforters and quilts so as they can be easily changed if any issues like loose stitching or uneven surfaces of the item occur.

  • Cost

An average range for a comforter can be anywhere around $25 to $80. If one is looking for a luxury set of comforters, the price might increase from $80 to $100. On the other hand, a decent range of quilts starts from $40, but when looking for a much more luxurious segment, the quilt sets start from $99. In most retail stores, one would get comforters in the range of $30 to $45.

  • Maintenance

As quilts are sewn with much heavier fabric sandwiched between its two layers, they require much larger washing machines for cleanliness that an individual can find at a laundromat. On the other hand, comforters are just two cloth pieces attached with a litter fabric. These can be washed in any standard-sized washer and dryer. 

  • Durability

As comforters are made of a much lighter material, and their maintenance is much easier than quilts, they can last anywhere from 15 years to 25 years. On the other hand, a quilt can last up to 15 years when maintained properly, and one airs it regularly.

  • Style

There are three basic types of quilts:

  1. Patchwork quilts are made from pieces of cloth torn into squares and triangles and then stitched together
  2. appliqué quilts made from nuanced cut-out patterns in different shapes
  3. embroidered quilts where the embroidery stitches form patterns on solid-colored fabric.

There are various kinds of comforters. Listed below are some of them:

  1. Bamboo
  2. Brocade
  3. Cotton Down-filled.
  4. Faux suede.
  5. Flannel.

Who Should Buy a Quilt?

  • Hot sleepers

Quilts are much thinner and lightweight in comparison to comforters. So if you’re a hot sleeper and want just the right amount of insulation, quilts are best. However, it does not keep you hot.

  • Prefer decorative bedding

If you want a much more aesthetic vibe to your room or a decorative touch to your place, you can have a quilt on your bed or over a blanket for much more eye-pleasing purposes.

  • Need heavily weighted cover

If you’re someone who wants a heavy cover or many layers while sleeping, quilts are for you. As these are sewn from multiple layers of fabrics, though made of lightweight materials, they provide a heavy feel while one sleeps.

  • Prefer a dry cleaners

If you’re someone who always has to be prim and proper with their bedding styles, having a quilt dry cleaned is a must task. 

Who Should Buy a Comforter?

  • Need a fluffy bedding

If you’re someone who needs a much fluffier type of bedding style, a comforter is a perfect choice for you. Quilts have a much thinner look and feel.

  • Fewer layers

The ones who prefer fewer layers while they sleep have to choose a comforter in this case. It has no extra layers to it.

  • Live in a colder/extreme climate.

People who stay in habitats of extreme temperatures or much colder environments need something to top over their quilts. For example, one can use a comforter on a quilt for a perfect warm sleep.

  • A knack for laundromat

If you’re someone who likes getting their linens laundered regularly, a comforter is for you.

  • Want some flexibility

In actual truth, a comforter can also be considered just a duvet’s inner part. So if you want to give an easy and fresh feel to your room, you can just remove the cover of the duvet and have a comforter for the look.

  • Have a centralized AC

If you are someone who has a centralized AC, you can use a comforter as it does not keep you that warm, and you don’t sweat. 

Conclusion

Whenever a person is in a dilemma about whether I should get a quilt or a comforter, we’ve given a clear demarcation to sort out this task. Depending on varied fabrics, purpose, warrant expectations, kind of sleeping patterns, and cost-effectiveness, one can have a clear picture after reading this article of which will best suit quilt vs comforter for summers and winters. 

The answer to this question is very passive. A quilt is not particularly better than a comforter, but it is much more appropriate for different kinds of sleepers. For example, hot sleepers should go for a quilt.

As comforters are always much warmer than quilts, if one wants to maintain a stable body temperature and likes to sleep cooler, one should always opt for light-weighted quilts.

When one would compare quilt vs comforters for summer, one can surely say that the breathable and lightweight fabric of quilt makes them a better choice for summers and their ability to keep the right amount of weight on the body while sleeping during Summers. 

 The answer to this question is a simple Yes! You can surely have a quilt over your comforter to add that extra layer of warmth and coziness but make sure that quilt isn’t too heavy as it can reduce some fluffiness of the comforter.

Generally, quilts are much more light weighted and smaller in dimension. As these are made of lighter fabrics, they keep the body much cooler.



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Meet Our Review Board

Each week our team researches, writes and collaborates with industry leaders to bring you simple easy-to-read sleep information.

David Bridge

Sleep Coach

Siddhesh Tiwatne

Sleep Coach

Authored by health experts and journalists

Fact checked and science-backed

Medically reviewed by physicians